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Uphill Flow of Reform in China’s Irrigation Districts

  • James E. Nickum
Part of the Water Resources Development and Management book series (WRDM)

Keywords

Cultural Revolution Water Price Irrigation Management Cost Recovery Institutional Reform 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Nickum

There are no affiliations available

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