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Comparative Genetic Mapping in Trees: The Group of Conifers

  • D.B. Neale
  • K.V. Krutovsky
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 55)

Keywords

Linkage Group Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone Linkage Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • D.B. Neale
  • K.V. Krutovsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Forest GeneticsPacific Southwest Research StationDavisUSA

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