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Robotic Finger that Imitates the Human Index Finger in the Number and Distribution of its Tendons

  • David M. Alba
  • Gabriel Bacallado
  • Hector Montes
  • Roberto Ponticelli
  • Theodore Akinfiev
  • Manuel Armada
Conference paper

Abstract

This paper presents the design of a robot finger driven by tendons, inspired in the human index finger tendon distribution. The design tries to minimize the number of tendons required, without sacrificing the number of actuated degrees of freedom. In this paper we will take the finger only in the planar position, we will not consider the adduction and abduction movements.

Keywords

Null Space Human Hand Extensor Digitorum Robot Hand Human Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Alba
    • 1
  • Gabriel Bacallado
    • 1
  • Hector Montes
    • 1
  • Roberto Ponticelli
    • 1
  • Theodore Akinfiev
    • 1
  • Manuel Armada
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto de Automática Industrial (CSIC)Arganda del Rey, Madrid

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