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Quasispecies in Time-Dependent Environments

  • C. O. Wilke
  • R. Forster
  • I. S. Novella
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 299)

Abstract

In recent years, quasispecies theory in time-dependent (that is, dynamically changing) environments has made dramatic progress. Several groups have addressed questions such as how the time scale of the changes affect viral adaptation and quasispecies formation, how environmental changes affect the optimal mutation rate, or how virus and host co-evolve. Here, we review these recent developments, and give a nonmathematical introduction to the most important concepts and results of quasispecies theory in time-dependent environments. We also compare the theoretical results with results from evolution experiments that expose viruses to successive regimes of replication in two or more different hosts.

Keywords

Mutation Rate Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Virus Population Error Threshold Virus Evolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. O. Wilke
    • 1
  • R. Forster
    • 2
  • I. S. Novella
    • 3
  1. 1.Section of Integrative Biology and Center for Computational Biology and BioinformaticsUniversity of TexasAustinUSA
  2. 2.Digital Life LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology, MC 136-93PasadenaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical Microbiology and ImmunologyMedical University OhioToledoUSA

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