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The versatile continuous order

  • Jimmie D. Lawson
Part II Structure Theory Of Continuous Posets And Related Objects
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 298)

Abstract

In this paper we survey some of the basic properties of continuously ordered sets, especially those properties that have led to their employment as the underlying structures for constructions in denotational semantics. The earlier sections concentrate on the order-theoretic aspects of continuously ordered sets and then specifically of domains. The last two sections are concerned with two natural topologies for sets with continuous orders, the Scott and Lawson topologies.

Keywords

Continuous Lattice Compact Element Algebraic Lattice Abstract Convexity Directed Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jimmie D. Lawson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsLouisiana State UniversityBaton Rouge

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