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From 0L and 1L map systems to indeterminate and determinate growth in plant morphogenesis

  • Jacqueline Lück
  • Hermann B. Lück
Part II Technical Contributions
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 291)

Abstract

Double wall map OL systems (dwMOL systems) are used to simulate the development of botanical organisms. Dw maps grow by half-wall segment substitution and by insertion of new double structured walls. This insertion of division walls is investigated exhaustively by specification of all possible sets of segment productions. (1) The case of segment parity between complementary half-walls : maps are characterized by synchronous divisions of all regions (or cells). Such systems are able, e.g., to simulate the inception of leaves at the top of plant shoots. (2) There is no segment parity in every wall : we assume some "streching" by interaction between half-walls and recover the parity. It results in a finite alphabet and maps with non dividing but still growing cells. The construction of this alphabet and the corresponding production set is realized via an IL system which generates "oppositely running double strings". Derivations of this system become production rules for a dwMOL system. Such map systems simulate growing plant-bodies with cells which become mitotically inactive but continue to elongate, just as in real organisms.

Key words

Map OL systems double-wall maps theoretical biology morphogenesis plant growth aging 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline Lück
    • 1
  • Hermann B. Lück
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Botanique analytique et Structuralisme végétal Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de St-JérômeMARSEILLE cedex 13France

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