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GAMERU: A language for the analysis and design of human communication pragmatics within organizational systems

  • F. De Cindio
  • G. De Michelis
  • C. Simone
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 266)

Abstract

This paper presents a research project carried out in the last years at the Dipartimento di Scienze dell'Informazione of the University of Milano. It is aimed at the development of conceptual and modelling tools for office analysis and for the design of office support systems.

Specifically, the paper concerns GAMERU, a language for office modelling, and how it supports the overall approach, which gives a particular emphasis to communication pragmatics.

GAMERU consists of a class of Petri nets, namely 1-safe Superposed Automata nets, and an interpretation inspired by Flores's Conversation for Action approach. It is supported by conceptual tools for dealing with the complexity of real offices modelling.

After an introduction sketching the foundations of the approach, section 2. gives the main definitions of GAMERU models and related tools. Section 3. presents examples of office models, while Section 4. discusses how GAMERU models ‘implement’ the approach.

Keywords

Constitutive Rule Asynchronous Communication Office System Synchronous Communication Office Modelling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. De Cindio
    • 1
  • G. De Michelis
    • 1
  • C. Simone
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Scienze dell'InformazioneUniversità di MilanoMilanoItaly

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