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Plan-based text generation in an on-line help system

  • Takashi Kakiuchi
  • Kuniaki Uehara
  • Jun'ichi Toyoda
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 264)

Abstract

This paper describes an on-line help system, ASSIST, which is designed to produce multiparagragh explanations in English in response to questions about computer terminology. ASSIST's text generation mechanism is based on the speech act planning theory proposed by Cohen. Namely, generation process can be viewed as the process of planning utterances to achieve a discourse goal. In order for the system to have the ability to provide different responses in accordance with user's level of expertise, a user model is constructed throughout a session, and then utilized to determine how much detail is necessary. Critic can examine how much information is sufficient for the user and vary response by cutting off an unimportant, redundant goal during the course of planning. Furthermore, a focusing mechanism is introduced to ensure that the generated explanation is coherent. Focusing information is also used to decide on how to express each sentence, i.e., whether pronominalization can be applicable, which sentence form is more appropriate, an active voice or passive one, etc.

Keywords

User Model Knowledge Structure Assembly Language Conceptual Frame Text Generation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takashi Kakiuchi
    • 1
  • Kuniaki Uehara
    • 1
  • Jun'ichi Toyoda
    • 1
  1. 1.The Institute of Scientific and Industrial ResearchOsaka UniversityIbaraki, OsakaJapan

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