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Human-machine interaction and role/function/action-nets

  • Horst Oberquelle
Section 7 Application Of Nets
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 255)

Abstract

Descriptions of human-machine systems should reflect the user's perspective to be helpful for understanding her/his work-environment and for building up mental models needed for human-machine interaction (HMI). A conceptual framework for HMI is presented. It characterizes computer-supported work on three levels: on the first two levels in terms of co-operating roles played by human role players and in terms of functions which may be performed by persons or machines as actors. The dynamics are treated on a third level, called the action level.

A new set of closely related net interpretations for semi-formal, graphic system descriptions, called role/function/action-nets (RFA-nets), is introduced. They allow to express conceptual differences in a visual form, to vary the degree of detail on every level by providing proper abstraction mechanisms and to relate the conceptual levels by mixed graphic representations.

An example shows how RFA-nets can be applied in the early phases of co-operative systems development.

Key words

Human-machine interaction RFA-nets user-oriented descriptions 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Horst Oberquelle
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachbereich InformatikUniversität HamburgHamburg 13

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