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The evolution of variable stars

  • Stephen A. Becker
Stellar Evolution
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 274)

Abstract

Throughout the domain of the H-R diagram lie groupings of stars whose luminosity varies with time. These variable stars can be classified based on their observed properties into distinct types such as β Cephei stars, σ Cephei stars, and Miras, as well as many other categories. The underlying mechanism for the variability is generally felt to be due to four different causes: geometric effects, rotation, eruptive processes, and pulsation. In this review the focus will be on pulsation variables and how the theory of stellar evolution can be used to explain how the various regions of variability on the H-R diagram are populated. To this end a generalized discussion of the evolutionary behavior of a massive star, an intermediate-mass star, and a low-mass star will be presented.

Keywords

White Dwarf Main Sequence Variable Star Outer Envelope Asymptotic Giant Branch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen A. Becker
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaLos Alamos

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