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Data-oriented incremental programming environments

  • Peter B. Henderson
Programming-In-The-Small
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 244)

Abstract

As programming environments begin to mature researchers recognize the need to improve both their user interface and performance. The traditional command and batch oriented systems represent a poor match for the human cognitive system, which is very visually oriented and “computes” incrementally. This paper explores these latter two important aspects in the context of programming environments. A data-oriented system is a system in which users interact directly with system data (view and manipulate), instead of using a complex set of commands. Incremental systems are designed to improve performance by limiting computation to a restricted set of system data in response to a small — incremental — modification to this data.

Keywords

Horn Clause Incremental Algorithm Source Module Query Window Abstract Syntax Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter B. Henderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceSUNY at Stony BrookStony Brook

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