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How to clear a block: Plan formation in situational logic

  • Zohar Manna
  • Richard Waldinger
Deductive Databases, Planning, Synthesis
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 230)

Abstract

Problems in robot planning are approached by proving theorems in a new formulation of situational logic. A machine-oriented deductive-tableau inference system is adapted to this logic, with special attention being paid to the derivation of conditional and recursive plans. Equations and equivalences of the situational logic have been built into a unification algorithm for the system. Inductive proofs of theorems for even the simplest planning problems have been found to require challenging generalizations.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zohar Manna
    • 1
  • Richard Waldinger
    • 2
  1. 1.Weizmann InstituteStanford UniversityUSA
  2. 2.SRI InternationalUSA

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