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Sampling and sample preparation of environmental material

  • Richard G. Melcher
  • Thomas L. Peters
  • Herbert W. Emmel
Conference paper
Part of the Topics in Current Chemistry book series (TOPCURRCHEM, volume 134)

Keywords

Thermal Desorption Collection Efficiency Carbon Disulfide Porous Polymer Cascade Impactor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard G. Melcher
    • 1
  • Thomas L. Peters
    • 1
  • Herbert W. Emmel
    • 1
  1. 1.Michigan Applied Science and Technology LaboratoriesThe Dow Chemical CompanyMidlandUSA

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