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A realisation of a human-computer interface for naive users — A case study

  • Günter Haring
  • Theodor Krasser
Interfaces In The Field
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 178)

Abstract

The realisation of a human-computer interface for an information storage and retrieval system used by the staff of a company in mechanical engineering industry is described in this paper. The system had to be designed according to the needs, skills and data processing background of this user group, taking the tasks to be performed into consideration. The system design process, based on human factor design goals and integrating quality control, is compared with the usual software development procedure. The description of the system explains the way in which different dialogue tools such as menu selection, form filling, function keys etc. have been integrated. Data entry and query functions are used as examples.

Keywords

Design Goal System Design Process Menu Selection Software Life Cycle Naive User 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Günter Haring
    • 1
  • Theodor Krasser
    • 1
  1. 1.Technische UniversitätGrazAustria

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