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Computing a perfect strategy for n×n chess requires time exponential in n

  • Aviezri S. Fraenkel
  • David Lichtenstein
Session 9: K. Mehlhorn, Chairman
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 115)

Abstract

It is proved that a natural generalization of chess to an n×n board is complete in exponential time. This implies that there exist chess-positions on an n×n chess-board for which the problem of determining who can win from that position requires an amount of time which is at least exponential in n.

Keywords

Decision Problem Polynomial Time Algorithm Exponential Time Board Game Board Position 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aviezri S. Fraenkel
    • 1
  • David Lichtenstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Applied MathematicsThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceYale UniversityNew HavenU.S.A.

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