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Simulation of complex shock reflections from wedges in inert and reactive gaseous mixtures

  • D. Book
  • J. Boris
  • A. Kuhl
  • E. Oran
  • M. Picone
  • S. Zalesak
Contributed Papers
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 141)

Abstract

Our calculations of complex and double Mach reflection are in close agreement with measurements for shocks reflecting in air from wedges. Because of the accuracy and speed of FCT algorithms and the effectiveness of adaptive rezoning, the calculations are accurate and economical even when the Mach stem develops very slowly. All of the important features (location of surfaces of discontinuity, pressure loading on the wedge surface, density contours) are correctly predicted. The results do not depend sensitively on whether the L-T or FAST2D code is used. Of the advances discussed in Section 1, multidimensional flux limiting and the adaptive regridding technique seem to be the most efficacious for reflections in nonreactive media. We conclude that FCT algorithms reduce numerical diffusion dramatically, assuring qualitative improvements in accuracy. We believe that to achieve comparable accuracy and efficiency, other hydrocodes must employ similar nonlinear algorithms and rezoning techniques.

Our calculations in reactive gas mixtures show that detonations tend to begin where a secondary pressure peak arises as the slip surface approaches the wedge. Because of the finite induction time in our kinetics model, the detonation begins somewhat behind this pressure peak. The high resolution our calculations achieve enables us to follow multiple reflections and is capable of providing quantitative predictions of detonation phenomena.

Keywords

Incident Shock Wedge Angle Numerical Diffusion Mach Stem Mach Reflection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bertrand, B. P., Measurement of Pressure in Mach Reflection of Strong Shock Waves in a Shock Tube, Ballistic Research Laboratories Report BRL-MR-2196 (1972).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Book
    • 1
  • J. Boris
    • 1
  • A. Kuhl
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. Oran
    • 1
  • M. Picone
    • 1
  • S. Zalesak
    • 1
  1. 1.Naval Research LaboratoryWashington
  2. 2.R & D AssociatesMarina del Rey

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