Advertisement

Submicron Particles from the Sun

  • Curtis L. Hemenway
2 In Measurement of Interplanetary Dust 2.3 Particle Collection Experiments and Their Interpretation
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 48)

Abstract

A review is given which suggests that cosmic dust theoretical and experimental studies are still beset with uncertainty and inaccuracy. A significant body of interrelated evidence exists which indicates that the solar system has two populations of dust particles, a submicron population generated and emitted by the sun and a larger size population spiraling inward toward the sun. The submicron component may provide the missing coupling mechanism between solar sunspot activity and meteorological activity in the earth's atmosphere.

Keywords

Sunspot Number Particle Flux Submicron Particle Refractory Element Sunspot Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    H. Fechtig and C. Hemenway, “Near-Earth Fragmentation of Cosmic Dust”, IAU Colloquium 31, 1976, this. volume.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    C. Hemenway, et al “Near-Earth Cosmic Dust Results from S 149”, AIAA/AGU Conference on the Scientific Experiments of SKYLAB, Huntsville, Ala. 1974.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. Hallgren. et al “Noctilucent Cloud Sampling by a Multi-Experiment Payload”, Space Research XIII, p. 1105–1112, 1973.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Fullam, Private Communication.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    P. Rauser, H. Fechtig, “Combined Dust Collection and Detection Experiment During a Noctilucent Cloud Display Above Kiruna, Sweden”, Space Research XII, p. 391–402, 1972.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. Morrison, et al “Elemental Abundances of Lunar Soil and Rocks”, Proceedings of the Apollo II Lunar Science Conference, Houston, 1970, V. 2, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta Supp. 1, p. 1383–1392, 1970.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    C. Hemenway, et al “Electron Microscope Studies of Noctilucent Cloud Particles”, Tellus, V. 16, p. 96–102, 1964.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    L. Standeford, “The Dynamics of Charged Interplanetary Grains”, Thesis, University of Illinois, 1968.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    D. Blackwell and M. Ingham, “Observations of Zodiacal Light from a Very High Altitude Station. I The Average Zodiacal Light”, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, V. 122, p.113–127, 1961.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    E. Schneider, et al “Microcraters on Apollo 15 and 16 Samples and Corresponding Cosmic Dust Fluxes”, Proceedings of the Fourth Lunar Science Conference, Houston, 1973, V. 3, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta Supp. 4, p. 3277–3290, 1973.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    R. Powell, et al “Analysis of All Available Zodiacal-Light Observations”, The Zodiacal Light and the Interplanetary Medium, National Aeronautical and Space Administration, Washington, NASA SP-150, p. 225–241, 1967.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    T. Hicks, et al “An Investigation of the Motion of Zodiacal Light Particles I”, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, V. 166, p. 439–448, 1974.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    J. Greenberg, “Interstellar Grains”, Nebulae and Interstellar Matter, Stars and Stellar Systems, University of Chicago Press, V. 7, p. 221–361, 1968.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    C. Allen. “Astrophysical Quantities”, 2nd. ed., University of London, The Athlone Press, p. 170, 185, 1963.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    M. Minnaert, “The Photosphere”, The Sun, The Solar System, University of Chicago Press, V. 1, p. 88–185, 1953.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    S. Pottasch, “Review of Astrophysical Conclusions from the UV Solar Spectra”, International Astronomical Union Symposium. 36th. Lunteren, 1969. Dordrecht: D. Reidel, 1970, p. 241–249.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    E. Pettit and S. Nicholson, “Spectral Energy-Curve of Sun-Spots”, Astrophysical Journal, V. 71, p. 153–162, 1930.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    C. De Jager, “Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere”, Handbuch der Physik, V. 52, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1959, p. 174.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    C. Villmann, “Space-Time Regularities of Noctilucent Cloud Displays”, Physics of Mesopheric (Noctilucent) Clouds, Proceedings of the Conference on Mesopheric Clouds, Riga, 1968. Jerusalem: Israel Program for Scientific Translations, 1973, p. 86–95.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    N. Wickramasinghe, “Interstellar Grains”, London: Chapman and Hall, 1967.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    E. Bowen, “Kidson's Relation Between Sunspot Number and the Movement of High Pressure Systems in Australia”, Possible Relationships Between Solar Activity and Meteorological Phenomena, Proceedings of a Symposium held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1973. NASA Goddard SFC Preprint X-901-74-156, p. 56–59 (To be published subsequently as a NASA Special Publication).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    W. Roberts, “Relationships Between Solar Activity and Climate Change”, Possible Relationships Between Solar Activity and Meteorological Phenomena, Proceedings of a Symposium held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1973. NASA Goddard SFC Preprint X-901-74-156, p. 3–23 (To be published subsequently as a NASA Special Publication).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    A. Douglass, “Tree Rings and Their Relation to Solar Variations and Chronology”, Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution, p. 304, 1931.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    O. Vasil'ev, “Frequency Spectrum of Noctilucent Cloud Displays and Their Connection with Solar Activity”, Physics of Mesopheric (Noctilucent) Clouds, Proceedings of the Conference on Mesopheric Clouds, Riga, 1968, Jerusalem: Israel Program for Scientific Translations, 1973, p. 100–113.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    J. Rosinski, Private Communication.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    M. Waldmeier, M. 1939 “Über die Struktur der Sonnenflecken”, Astron. Mitt. Zürich, No. 138, 439.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Curtis L. Hemenway
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für KernphysikGermany

Personalised recommendations