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Pioneer 10 observations of zodiacal light brightness near the ecliptic: Changes with heliocentric distance

  • M. S. Hanner
  • J. G. Sparrow
  • J. L. Weinberg
  • D. E. Beeson
1 Zodiacal Light 1.1 Observation from Space
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 48)

Abstract

Sky maps made by the Pioneer 10 Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) at sun-spacecraft distances from 1 to 3 AU have been analyzed to derive the brightness of the zodiacal light near the ecliptic at elongations greater than 90 degrees.The change in zodiacal light brightness with heliocentric distance is compared with models of the spatial distribution of the dust. Use of background starlight brightnesses derived from IPP measurements beyond the asteroid belt, where the zodiacal light is not detected, and, especially, use of a corrected calibration lead to considerably lower values for zodiacal light than those reported by us previously.

Keywords

Heliocentric Distance Ecliptic Plane Brightness Variation Asteroid Belt Dust Density 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Hanner
    • 1
  • J. G. Sparrow
    • 1
  • J. L. Weinberg
    • 1
  • D. E. Beeson
    • 1
  1. 1.Space Astronomy LaboratoryState University of New York at AlbanyUSA

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