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Romansy 16 pp 447-454 | Cite as

Mobile robot localization using laser range scanner and omnicamera

  • Mariusz Olszewski
  • Barbara Siemiatkowska
  • Rafal Chojecki
  • Piotr Marcinkiewicz
  • Piotr Trojanek
  • Marek Majchrowski
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 487)

Abstract

In this paper a method of mobile robot localization in an unknown indoor environment is presented. The robot is equipped with a single omni-directional camera and a laser range finder. The data of the 2D scanner is used to detect walls in the robot environment. The images taken from omnicamera allow to detect texture on the walls. The robot’s position can easily be estimated by combining information taken from the camera and from the laser scanner and this data can be used to follow the robot’s path. The method has been tested with the use of mobile robot ELEKTRON Rl in a real office environment.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Discrete Cosine Transform Laser Range Finder Vertex Point Canonical Signature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariusz Olszewski
    • 2
    • 3
  • Barbara Siemiatkowska
    • 1
    • 3
  • Rafal Chojecki
    • 2
    • 3
  • Piotr Marcinkiewicz
    • 2
    • 3
  • Piotr Trojanek
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marek Majchrowski
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Fundamental Technological ResearchPolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Institute of Automatic Control and RoboticsWarsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland
  3. 3.Institute of Control and Computation EngineeringWarsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland

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