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Romansy 16 pp 387-394 | Cite as

Design and Control of the Ball Wheel Drive Mechanism for a Robust Omnidirectional Wheeled Mobile Platform

  • Young-Chul Lee
  • Danny V. Lee
  • Jae H. Chung
  • Duane A. Bennett
  • Steven A. Velinsky
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 487)

Abstract

This paper discusses design and control of a new ball wheel drive mechanism for a robust omnidirectional wheeled mobile platform. This platform is designed for use in the highway maintenance and construction area, which is a generally an unstructured and congested environment. The proposed ball wheel mechanism can move in all directions on the plane, instantaneously and isotropically. Other novel features include: active regulation of traction drive contact pressure and an optimally controlled reconfigurable drive system.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Contact Pressure Mobile Platform Motor Torque Drive Wheel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Young-Chul Lee
    • 1
  • Danny V. Lee
    • 1
  • Jae H. Chung
    • 2
  • Duane A. Bennett
    • 1
  • Steven A. Velinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical EngineeringUniversity of California-DavisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringStevens Institute of TechnologyHobokenUSA

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