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Romansy 16 pp 297-304 | Cite as

Towards Realistic Surgical Simulation: Biomechanics of Needle Insertion into the Brain

  • Tonmoy Dutta-Roy
  • Adam Wittek
  • Zeike Taylor
  • Kiyoyuki Chinzei
  • Toshikatsu Washio
  • Karol Miller
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 487)

Abstract

Robotic surgery has been recognised in the past few years to have immense potential. Understanding the biomechanics of surgical procedures is central to robotic surgery. Needle insertion into soft tissues is a common surgical procedure but the biomechanics of needle insertion is poorly understood. We developed a computational biomechanical model to understand the mechanics of needle insertion into the brain tissue. The brain tissue is considered as a single phase continuum undergoing finite deformations. A non-linear constitutive model of the brain tissue is used. Precise geometrical model of the brain is obtained from MRI images and the brain mesh is created. The brain computational model is verified by comparing with previously published experimental results for porcine brain indentation. The reaction forces acting on the needle during insertion are obtained using fully non-linear, explicit Finite Element procedures in time domain.

Keywords

Robotic Surgery Needle Insertion Porcine Brain Finite Element Head Model Organ Deformation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tonmoy Dutta-Roy
    • 1
  • Adam Wittek
    • 1
  • Zeike Taylor
    • 1
  • Kiyoyuki Chinzei
    • 2
  • Toshikatsu Washio
    • 2
  • Karol Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Intelligent Systems for Medicine LaboratoryThe University of Western AustraliaCrawley/PerthAustralia
  2. 2.Institute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, Surgical Assist Technology GroupAISTTsukubaJapan

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