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Romansy 16 pp 287-294 | Cite as

From the Human Hand to a Humanoid Hand: Biologically-Inspired Approach for the Development of RoboCasa Hand #1

  • Massimiliano Zecca
  • Stefano Roccella
  • Giovanni Cappiello
  • Kazuko Ito
  • Kazutaka Imanishi
  • Hiroyasu Miwa
  • M. Chiara Carrozza
  • Paolo Dario
  • Atsuo Takanishi
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 487)

Abstract

In a society getting older year by year, Robot technology (RT) is expected to play an important role. In order to achieve this objective, the new generation of personal robots should be capable of a natural communication with humans by expressing human-like emotion. In this sense, the hands play a fundamental role in communication, because they have grasping, sensing and emotional expression ability. This paper presents the recent results of the collaboration between the Takanishi Lab of Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, and the Arts Lab of Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy, and RoboCasa in a biologically-inspired approach for the development of a new humanoid hand. In particular, the grasping and gestural capabilities of the novel anthropomorphic hand for humanoid robotics RCH-1 (RoboCasa Hand No.1) are presented.

Keywords

Humanoid Robot Human Hand Prosthetic Hand Robotic Hand Robot Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimiliano Zecca
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stefano Roccella
    • 3
  • Giovanni Cappiello
    • 3
  • Kazuko Ito
    • 4
  • Kazutaka Imanishi
    • 4
  • Hiroyasu Miwa
    • 1
    • 5
    • 6
  • M. Chiara Carrozza
    • 2
    • 3
  • Paolo Dario
    • 2
    • 3
  • Atsuo Takanishi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
    • 7
  1. 1.Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical CareWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.RoboCasaWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.ARTS LabScuola Superiore Sant’AnnaPisaItaly
  4. 4.Department of Mechanical EngineeringWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Humanoid Robotics Institute (HRI)Waseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Digital Human Research CentreNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)TokyoJapan
  7. 7.Advanced Research Institute for Science and EngineeringWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan

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