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Romansy 16 pp 247-254 | Cite as

The mechanical improvements of the anthropomorphic flutist robot WF-4RII to increas the sound clarity and to enhance the interactivity with humans

  • Jorge Solis
  • Kei Suefuji
  • Koichi Taniguchi
  • Atsuo Takanishi
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 487)

Abstract

The development of the anthropomorphic flutist robot, at Waseda University, has focused on imitating the human flute playing by mechanically reproducing the organs involved during such activity. Our research aims in understanding several aspects of the human flute playing: clarifying the human motor control while performing skillful activities, enabling robots to express ideas and feelings in musical terms and proposing new ways of interaction between the human and the robot. In this paper the new version of the flutist robot, the Waseda Flutist Robot No. 4 Refined II, is presented. The improvements of the mechanical system in order to improve the sound clarity of the robot’s performance and to enhance the interaction with humans are described. A set of experiments were carried out to verify the effectiveness of the mechanical components. As a result, the robot is able of performing a musical score with more clarity and furthermore, the robot can interact with humans more natural using the vision system.

Keywords

Humanoid Robot Musical Score Face Tracking Mechanical Noise Mechanical Improvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge Solis
    • 1
  • Kei Suefuji
    • 2
  • Koichi Taniguchi
    • 2
  • Atsuo Takanishi
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Science and EngineeringWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Humanoid Robotics InstituteWaseda UniversityTokyoJapan

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