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Romansy 16 pp 121-128 | Cite as

Invariant Error Dynamics Controller for a 6-dof Electrohydraulic Stewart Platform

  • Ioannis Davliakos
  • Evangelos Papadopoulos
Part of the CISM Courses and Lectures book series (CISM, volume 487)

Abstract

The study of an invariant error dynamics controller for a six-degrees-of-freedom (dof) electrohydraulic Stewart platform is presented. Rigid body and electrohydraulic models, including servovalve dynamics are employed. Friction is also included in the mechanical model. The developed controller employs the dynamic and hydraulic model of the system and yields the six servovalve input current vector, in analytical form. Using mechanism inverse kinematics, the desired Cartesian trajectories yield desired actuator length trajectories. Simulations with typical desired trajectories are presented and a good performance of the controller is obtained.

Keywords

Stewart Platform Develop Controller Invariant Error Platform Displacement Actuator Current 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© CISM, Udine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ioannis Davliakos
    • 1
  • Evangelos Papadopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensAthensGreece

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