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Benign Intracranial Disease: Benign Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Arteriovenous Malformations, and Trigeminal Neuralgia

  • Rupesh Kotecha
  • Samuel T. Chao
  • Erin S. Murphy
  • John H. Suh
Chapter
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

The meninges are the membranes that envelop the brain and spinal cord and consist of three separate layers. The dura mater is the outer connective tissue layer, itself composed of an outer endosteal layer and an inner meningeal layer. The dura mater forms a double fold to create the falx cerebri (separates the cerebral hemispheres), tentorium cerebelli (separates the occipital lobes of the cerebrum from the cerebellum), falx cerebelli (separates the cerebellar hemispheres), and the diaphragma sellae (covers the pituitary gland). The middle layer, the arachnoid membrane, and the inner layer, the pia mater, together are referred to as the leptomeninges. Cerebrospinal fluid flows through the space between the arachnoid membrane and the pia matter (Schünke et al. 2007).

Keywords

Pituitary Adenoma Cavernous Sinus Trigeminal Nerve Trigeminal Neuralgia Trigeminal Ganglion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rupesh Kotecha
    • 1
  • Samuel T. Chao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Erin S. Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • John H. Suh
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Taussig Cancer InstituteCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology CenterCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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