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Correlation of Skeletal Muscle Anatomy to MRI and US Findings

  • Alberto Tagliafico
  • Bianca Bignotti
  • Sonia Airaldi
  • Carlo Martinoli
Chapter
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

Muscles are anatomical structures with the capability to reduce their length if stimulated appropriately. In this chapter the anatomy of the skeletal muscle and of its imaging appearance are briefly reviewed. The anatomic description starts from the microscopical anatomy to reach the macroscopical anatomy. Biomechanical principles of levers and muscular contraction are also reviewed. Imaging features are described with an emphasis on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, a brief overview on accessory muscles is presented.

Keywords

Diffusion Tensor Imaging Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Popliteal Artery Eccentric Contraction Muscle Thickness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

Electronic Supplementary Material (99308 kb)

Electronic Supplementary Material (37259 kb)

Electronic Supplementary Material (55672 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Tagliafico
    • 1
  • Bianca Bignotti
    • 2
  • Sonia Airaldi
    • 2
  • Carlo Martinoli
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Experimental Medicine (DIMES)University of GenovaGenoaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL)University of GenovaGenoaItaly

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