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Non-Infective Inflammatory Bone Marrow Disease

  • Bernhard J. Tins
  • Victor N. Cassar-Pullicino
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

Non-infective inflammatory bone marrow disease comprises a wide variety of disorders. This chapter aims to review the current thought on the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthropathies in particular and to investigate the role of the various imaging modalities in diagnosis and follow-up. Special emphasis will be given to MR imaging as the modality best suited to assess bone marrow changes. The main imaging features and differential diagnosis of the inflammatory arthropathies will be discussed in more detail with emphasis on ankylosing spondylitis, SAPHO and Psoriasis. MRI is the modality best suited to imaging inflammatory bone marrow change. With time secondary bone changes become visible in CT and radiographic imaging and these might be the first examinations to suggest a particular pathology which was hitherto clinically not suspected/diagnosed. For this reason CT and radiographic features of non-infective inflammatory bone marrow disease will also be briefly reviewed.

Keywords

Bone Marrow Oedema Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Osteoid Osteoma Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernhard J. Tins
    • 1
  • Victor N. Cassar-Pullicino
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyRobert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic HospitalShropshireUK

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