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The Infertile Male-1: Clinical Features

  • Giovanni Liguori
  • Carlo Trombetta
  • Bernardino de Concilio
  • Alessio Zordani
  • Michele Rizzo
  • Stefano Bucci
  • Emanuele Belgrano
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

Male infertility affects 10% of couples and is treatable in many cases. The evaluation of infertility is initiated typically after 1 year of failure to conceive. Clinical evaluation of the infertile man requires a complete medical history, physical examination, and laboratory studies in order to identify and treat correctable causes of subfertility and recognize those who are candidates for assisted reproductive technologies, those who are sterile and should consider adoption or artificial insemination using donor sperm, and those who should undergo genetic screening. Although pregnancies can be achieved without any evaluation other than a semen analysis, this test alone is insufficient to adequately evaluate the male patient. Treatment of correctable male-factor pathology is cost effective, does not increase the risk of multiple births, and can spare the woman invasive procedures and potential complications associated with assisted reproductive technologies.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Follicle Stimulate Hormone Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Assisted Reproductive Technology Premature Ejaculation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giovanni Liguori
    • 1
  • Carlo Trombetta
    • 1
  • Bernardino de Concilio
    • 1
  • Alessio Zordani
    • 1
  • Michele Rizzo
    • 1
  • Stefano Bucci
    • 1
  • Emanuele Belgrano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of TriesteTriesteItaly

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