Skip to main content

CAS 2018/A/5800 Samir Arab v. Union Européenne de Football Association (UEFA), Award of 14 November 2018

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Yearbook of International Sports Arbitration 2018–2020

Part of the book series: Yearbook of International Sports Arbitration ((YISA))

Abstract

This case is a part of a complex trial concerning a match-fixing plot in Maltese football. The context of this affair involves a match-fixing criminal group with ramifications in Europe and Asia, which were approaching young players of the Maltese U-21 national team, offering them EUR 3,000 to fix certain UEFA U-21 Championship matches, for betting purposes. One of these players, Samir Arab, failed to inform the relevant bodies of such repeated approaches. Although he later collaborated with the judicial authorities, the UEFA CEDB found him guilty of “failure to report” (Article 12(2)(d) UEFA DR) and banned him from football activities for approximately two years. However, the UEFA Appeals Body changed the legal qualification of the offence into “active match-fixing” (Article 12(2)(a) UEFA DR), while maintaining the same ban. The CAS dismissed the Player’s appeal, stating mainly that a sanction imposed by a disciplinary body in the exercise of its discretion, as allowed by the relevant rules, could be reviewed only when such sanction was evidently and grossly disproportionate to the offence, which was not the case here. Besides this, the Player could not benefit from a reduction of the sanction based on the concept of “substantial assistance”. Finally, the CAS reminded us that the res iudicata principle, as enshrined in Swiss law, limits the discretion of appeals bodies to re-examine the case and does not allow them to change the legal qualification of the offence into “active match-fixing”, instead of the lesser grave “failure to report”.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Hardcover Book
USD 139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Notes

  1. 1.

    From an abundant jurisprudence, see, for example: CAS 2016/A/4595 Al Ittihad Saudi v. Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), Award of 21 November 2016, paras 59 et seq.; CAS 2019/A/6393 Cruzeiro Esporte Clube v. Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), Award of 17 February 2020, paras 85 et seq.

  2. 2.

    “The extent to which the otherwise applicable period of Ineligibility may be suspended shall be based on the seriousness of the anti-doping rule violation committed and the significance of the Substantial Assistance proved by the Athlete or other Person to the effort to eliminate doping in sport. No more than three-quarters of the otherwise applicable period of Ineligibility may be suspended” (Article 10.6.1.1 World Anti-Doping Code (edition 2015).

  3. 3.

    Council of Europe Convention on the Manipulation of Sports Competitions (Macolin Convention, CETS 215).

  4. 4.

    See notably Articles 6 and 7 Macolin Convention.

  5. 5.

    CAS 2013/A/3256, Fenerbahçe Spor Kulübü v. UEFA, award of 11 April 2014, paras 138–140, quoted at para 96.

  6. 6.

    Oberhammer and Naegeli (2014), Article 236, no. 39 et seq., quoted in para 96.

  7. 7.

    CAS 2010/A/2266, N. and V. v. UEFA, award of 5 May 2011, paras 43 and 81.

  8. 8.

    CAS 2015/A/4351, Vsl Pakruojo FK (“Pakruojo”), Darius Jankauskas, Arnas Mikaitis, Sigitas Olberkis, Valdas Pocevicius, Alfredas Skroblas, Donatas Strockis, Diogo Gouveia Miranda, C. H. Alexandru and Taras Michailiuk v. Lithuanian Football Federation (“LFF”), award of 13 July 2016.

  9. 9.

    CAS 2014/A/3467, Guillermo Olaso de la Rica v. Tennis Integrity Unit (“TIU”), award of 30 September 2014, at para 122.

  10. 10.

    CAS 2011/A/2364, Salman Butt v. ICC, award dated 17 April 2013, at paras 56–57 and 60, 66–69 and 74–75.

  11. 11.

    IOC Guidelines for Sports organizations the Sanctioning Competition Manipulation (2018).

  12. 12.

    See a list of cases analysed (in reverse chronological order) by: Diaconu et al. (2021); Diaconu and Kuhn (2019); Palermo and Williams (2018); Blackshaw (2018); White (2017); Beffa and Ducrey (2015).

  13. 13.

    See CAS 2019/A/6439, Samson Siasia v. FIFA, award of 21 June 2021. In this case, the initial sanction decided against Mr. Siasia by the FIFA Ethics Committee was modified from a life ban—considered excessive—to a five-year ban, and the fine of CHF 50,000 was set aside.

  14. 14.

    For an overview of the recent CAS jurisprudence on match-fixing, see Diaconu et al. (2021).

  15. 15.

    CAS 2019/A/6439, Samson Siasia v. FIFA, award of 21 June 2021.

  16. 16.

    CAS 2014/A/3628, Eskişehirspor Kulübü (“Eskişehirspor”) v. UEFA, award of 2 September 2014.

  17. 17.

    CAS 2013/A/3297, Public Joint-Stock Company “Football Club Metalist” (“Metalist”) v. UEFA and PAOK FC, award of 29 November 2013.

  18. 18.

    CAS 2010/A/2266, N. and V. v. UEFA, award of 5 May 2011.

  19. 19.

    CAS 2011/A/2490, Daniel Köllerer v. Association of Tennis Professionals (“ATP”), Women’s Tennis Association, International Tennis Federation and Grand Slam Committee, award of 23 March 2012.

  20. 20.

    CAS 2011/A/2621, David Savic v. Professional Tennis Integrity Officers, award of 5 September 2012.

  21. 21.

    For an analysis, see International Olympic Committee—United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (2019).

  22. 22.

    CAS 2011/A/2364, Salman Butt v. ICC, award dated 17 April 2013.

References

  • Beffa L, Ducrey L (2015) Review of the 2014 case law of the Swiss Federal Tribunal concerning sports arbitration. Causa Sport: die Sport-Zeitschrift für nationales und internationales Recht sowie für Wirtschaft (Issue 2)115–123

    Google Scholar 

  • Blackshaw I (2018) The role of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in countering the manipulation of sport. In: Breuer M, Forrest D (eds) The Palgrave handbook on the economics of manipulation in sport. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, pp 223–246

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Diaconu M, Kuhn A (2019) Match-fixing, the Macolin Convention and Swiss law: an overview. Jusletter (jusletter.weblaw.ch) 16 September 2019. https://jusletter.weblaw.ch/juslissues/2019/992/match-fixing_-the-ma_a4c44d5ea2.html

  • Diaconu M, Kuwelkar S, Kuhn A (2021) The Court of Arbitration for Sport jurisprudence on match-fixing: a legal update. ISLJ (2021) 21:27–46

    Google Scholar 

  • International Olympic Committee – United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (2019) Reporting Mechanisms in Sport. A Practical Guide for Development and Implementation

    Google Scholar 

  • Oberhammer P, Naegeli G (2014) Art. 236. In: Oberhammer P, Domej T, Haas U (eds) Kurzkommentar ZPO: Schweizerische Zivilprozessordnung. Helbing Lichtenhahn Verlag

    Google Scholar 

  • Palermo G, Williams B (2018) Match-fixing and the evolution of CAS Jurisprudence. CAS Bull 2:8–25

    Google Scholar 

  • White G (2017) Why sport needs a unified approach to sanctions for corruption offences. LawInSport. https://www.lawinsport.com/topics/item/why-sport-needs-a-unified-approach-to-sanctions-for-corruption-offences

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Madalina Diaconu .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 T.M.C. Asser Press and the authors

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Diaconu, M. (2022). CAS 2018/A/5800 Samir Arab v. Union Européenne de Football Association (UEFA), Award of 14 November 2018. In: Duval, A., Rigozzi, A. (eds) Yearbook of International Sports Arbitration 2018–2020. Yearbook of International Sports Arbitration. T.M.C. Asser Press, The Hague. https://doi.org/10.1007/15757_2022_37

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/15757_2022_37

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: T.M.C. Asser Press, The Hague

  • Print ISBN: 978-94-6265-510-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-6265-511-9

  • eBook Packages: Law and CriminologyLaw and Criminology (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics