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Self-Healing Metals

  • Blazej GrabowskiEmail author
  • C. Cem Tasan
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Polymer Science book series (POLYMER, volume 273)

Abstract

Designing self-healing in metals is a challenging task. Self-healing concepts successfully applied in polymers cannot be directly transferred because of different energetics. This has detained the field of self-healing metals, as evidenced by absolute publication numbers. Yet, relative publication numbers indicate a rapidly increasing interest in recent years triggered by the potential economic impact of advanced metallic materials. This chapter reviews all currently available self-healing concepts in bulk metallic materials. We provide a classification into two conceptually distinct routes: (1) autonomous self-healing of nanovoids at the nanoscale, aiming at a prevention of large-scale damage and (2) non-autonomous self-healing of macrocracks by an external trigger such as heat. The general idea of each self-healing concept is comprehensibly introduced, relevant publications are reviewed, and the characteristics of the concepts are compared. Finally, we discuss current constraints and identify the most promising concepts.

Keywords

Crack closure Nanoparticles Phase transformation Precipitation Self-healing metals Shape-memory alloys Solder 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SPP 1568) and the European Research Council under the EU’s 7th Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC Grant Agreement No. 290998 is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschumg GmbHDüsseldorfGermany

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