Modern Techniques for Nano- and Microreactors/-reactions pp 51-87

Part of the Advances in Polymer Science book series (POLYMER, volume 229)

Enzyme-Encapsulated Layer-by-Layer Assemblies: Current Status and Challenges Toward Ultimate Nanodevices

Chapter

Abstract

Alternate layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption has received much attention as an emerging methodology. Biocompatibility is the most prominent advantage of the LbL assembly process because the technique employs mild conditions for film construction. Most enzymes, especially water-soluble ones, have charged sites at their surfaces so that electrostatic LbL adsorption is suitable for construction of various protein organizations. In this review chapter, we summarize recent developments on enzyme-encapsulated LbL devices and their related functions where “encapsulated” does not always entail entrapment within spherical structures but generally includes immobilization of enzymes within the LbL structures. Recent examples, with various functions such as reactor sensors and medical applications, are described within a classification of structural types, i.e., thin films and spherical capsules. In addition to conventional applications, advanced systems including integration of LbL structures into advanced devices such as microchannels, field effect transistors, and flow injection amperometric sensors are introduced as well as recent developments in hybridization of LbL assemblies with functional nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube, dendrimers, nanoparticles, lipid assemblies, and mesoporous materials, all of which can enhance bio-related functions of LbL assemblies.

Keywords

Devices Enzymes Hollow capsules Layer-by-layer assemblies Thin films 

Abbreviation

AChE

Acetylcholinesterase

ADP

Adenosine diphosphate

AFP

α-1-Fetoprotein antigen

ALP

Alkaline phosphatase

ATP

Adenosine triphosphate

BMS

Bimodal mesoporous silica

BSA

Bovine serum albumin

ChO

Choline oxidase

CNT

Carbon nanotube

Cyt P 450cam

Cytochrome P450cam

DEAE

Diethylaminoethyl

DL-1

Delta-like 1

DMPC

Dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine

DMSO

Dimethylsulfoxide

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid

DNase

Deoxyribonuclease

DPPC

Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine

dsDNA

Double-stranded DNA

ENFET

Enzyme field-effect transistor

FAD

Flavin adenine dinucleotide

GA

Glucoamylase

GCE

Glassy carbon electrode

GDH

Glucose dehydrogenase

GOD

Glucose oxidase

HA

Hyaluronic acid

Hb

Hemoglobin

HRP

Horseradish peroxidase

HSA

Human serum albumin

IgG

Immunoglobulin G

ISFET

Ion-sensitive field-effect transistor

ITO

Indium tin oxide

LB

LangmuirBlodgett

LbL

Layer-by-layer

LDH

Lactate dehydrogenase

LOD

Lactate oxidase

Mb

Myoglobin

MWNT

Multi-wall carbon nanotube

OPH

Organophosphorus hydrolase

PAA

Poly(acrylic acid)

PAH

Poly(allylamine hydrochloride)

PAMAM

Poly(amidoamine)

PDDA

Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)

PEI

Poly(ethyleneimine)

PET

Poly(ethylene terephthalate)

PGA

Poly(l-glutamic acid)

PLA2

Phospholipase A2

PLL

Poly(l-lysine)

PMA

Poly(methacrylic acid)

PMMA

Poly(methyl methacrylate)

POD

Peroxidase

PSS

Poly(styrenesulfonate)

PVP

Poly(vinylpyridine)

QCM

Quartz crystal microbalance

SAM

Self-assembled monolayer

SWNT

Single-walled carbon nanotube

Copyright information

© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katsuhiko Ariga
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qingmin Ji
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jonathan P. Hill
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA)National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)TsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Core Research of Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST)Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)TokyoJapan

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