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Consistent Modeling of the Static and Time-Derivative Cepstrums for Speech Recognition Using HSPTM

  • Yiu-Pong Lai
  • Man-Hung Siu
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4274)

Abstract

Most speech models represent the static and derivative cepstral features with separate models that can be inconsistent with each other. In our previous work, we proposed the hidden spectral peak trajectory model (HSPTM) in which the static cepstral trajectories are derived from a set of hidden trajectories of the spectral peaks (captured as spectral poles) in the time-frequency domain. In this work, the HSPTM is generalized such that both the static and derivative features are derived from a single set of hidden pole trajectories using the well-known relationship between the spectral poles and cepstral coefficients. As the pole trajectories represent the resonance frequencies across time, they can be interpreted as formant tracks in voiced speech which have been shown to contain important cues for phonemic identification. To preserve the common recognition framework, the likelihood functions are still defined in the cepstral domain with the acoustic models defined by the static and derivative cepstral trajectories. However, these trajectories are no longer separately estimated but jointly derived, and thus are ensured to be consistent with each other. Vowel classification experiments were performed on the TIMIT corpus, using low complexity models (2-mixture). They showed 3% (absolute) classification error reduction compared to the standard HMM of the same complexity.

Keywords

Speech Recognition Spectral Peak Signal Proc Audio Processing Speak Language Processing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yiu-Pong Lai
    • 1
  • Man-Hung Siu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electronic and Computer EngineeringThe Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong Kong

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