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Establishing Agile Partnerships in Open Environments: Extended Abstract

  • I. D. Stalker
  • M. Carpenter
  • N. D. Mehandjiev
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4277)

Abstract

The increasingly complex and volatile nature of many contemporary markets means that demands are often best satisfied through dynamic networks of collaborating enterprises. Successful collaboration demands tight, flexible integration of business processes, however, this assumes that an appropriate team has been assembled. Traditionally, a toplevel service or goal is decomposed into component services or subgoals each of which is then matched to a provider. This is a complex task and while automated tools exist, supported especially by the notions of service discovery and traders, significant guidance is typically sought from the user. This imposes a substantial burden of interaction and considerable knowledge is demanded of a user to decompose to a level of detail which allows for matching to known services. Problems arise if this is not the case and open environments, such as the internet, present additional difficulties: if a user is not up-to-date potential decompositions may be missed; new entrants into a market may not be recognised; etc. Bottom-up approaches circumvent some of these difficulties, but also come at a price. For example, where goal decompositions are available, these are typically much more inefficient; if there is only a fixed number of processes available within a system, the case of “no solution” may take considerable time to establish. Moreover, since many bottom-up approaches distribute control, the system is vulnerable to malicious behaviour. Thus, a certain level of trust is required.

Keywords

Business Process Open Environment Service Discovery Original Equipment Manufacturer Malicious Behaviour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Carpenter, M., Mehandjiev, N., Stalker, I.: Emergent process interoperability within virtual organisations. In: Proceedings of ATOP 2005, at AAMAS 2005 (2005)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Carpenter, M., Mehandjiev, N., Stalker, I.: Flexible behaviours for emergent process interoperability. In: Proceedings of PINCET 2006, at WETICE 2006 (2006)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Craig, I.: Blackboard Systems. Ablex, Norwood (1995)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. D. Stalker
    • 1
  • M. Carpenter
    • 1
  • N. D. Mehandjiev
    • 1
  1. 1.School of InformaticsUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK

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