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Exploring Social Context with the Wireless Rope

  • Tom Nicolai
  • Eiko Yoneki
  • Nils Behrens
  • Holger Kenn
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4277)

Abstract

The Wireless Rope is a framework to study the notion of social context and the detection of social situations by Bluetooth proximity detection with consumer devices and its effects on group dynamics. Users can interact through a GUI with members of an existing group or form a new group. Connection information is collected by stationary tracking devices and a connection map of all participants can be obtained via the web. Besides interaction with familiar persons, the Wireless Rope also includes strange persons to provide a rich representation of the surrounding social situation. This paper seeks to substantiate the notion of social context by an exploratory analysis of interpersonal proximity data collected during a computer conference. Two feature functions are presented that indicate typical situations in this setting.

Keywords

Mobile Phone Social Situation Ubiquitous Computing Pervasive Computing Track Station 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom Nicolai
    • 1
  • Eiko Yoneki
    • 2
  • Nils Behrens
    • 1
  • Holger Kenn
    • 1
  1. 1.TZI Wearable Computing LabUniversität BremenGermany
  2. 2.University of CambridgeUK

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