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An Introduction to Fuzzy Propositional Calculus Using Proofs from Assumptions

  • Iwan Tabakow
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4252)

Abstract

The subject of this paper is fuzzy propositional calculus. The proposed approach is related to the basic fuzzy propositional logics, i.e. to each of the following three most important such systems (in short: BL): Łukasiewicz’s, Gödel’s, and product logic. The logical calculi considered here are based on a system of rules that define the methods used in proofs from assumptions. To simplify the considered proofs some set of laws called also ‘primitive rules’ is next introduced. It was shown that any fuzzy propositional formula provable under Hájek’s axioms of the logic BL is also provable under the above-proposed approach.

Keywords

Fuzzy Logic Propositional Variable Axiomatic Approach Indirect Proof Truth Degree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iwan Tabakow
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Applied InformaticsWroclaw University of TechnologyPoland

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