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GPU Based Real-Time Instrument Tracking with Three Dimensional Ultrasound

  • Paul M. Novotny
  • Jeffrey A. Stoll
  • Nikolay V. Vasilyev
  • Pedro J. del Nido
  • Pierre E. Dupont
  • Robert D. Howe
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4190)

Abstract

Real-time 3D ultrasound can enable new image-guided surgical procedures, but high data rates prohibit the use of traditional tracking techniques. We present a new method based on the modified Radon transform that identifies the axis of instrument shafts as bright patterns in planar projections. Instrument rotation and tip location are then determined using fiducial markers. These techniques are amenable to rapid execution on the current generation of personal computer graphics processor units (GPU). Our GPU implementation detected a surgical instrument in 31 ms, sufficient for real-time tracking at the 26 volumes per second rate of the ultrasound machine. A water tank experiment found instrument tip position errors of less than 0.2 mm, and an in vivo study tracked an instrument inside a beating porcine heart. The tracking results showed good correspondence to the actual movements of the instrument.

Keywords

Tracking Algorithm Roll Angle Visual Servoing Ultrasound Volume Passive Marker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. Novotny
    • 1
  • Jeffrey A. Stoll
    • 2
  • Nikolay V. Vasilyev
    • 3
  • Pedro J. del Nido
    • 3
  • Pierre E. Dupont
    • 2
  • Robert D. Howe
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Engineering and Applied SciencesHarvard UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Aerospace and Mechanical EngineeringBoston UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Department of Cardiovascular SurgeryChildren’s Hospital BostonUSA

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