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A Novel Robotic Laser Ablation System for Precision Neurosurgery with Intraoperative 5-ALA-Induced PpIX Fluorescence Detection

  • Masafumi Noguchi
  • Eisuke Aoki
  • Daiki Yoshida
  • Etsuko Kobayashi
  • Shigeru Omori
  • Yoshihiro Muragaki
  • Hiroshi Iseki
  • Katsushige Nakamura
  • Ichiro Sakuma
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4190)

Abstract

We developed a combined system of tumor detection by 5-ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence and precise ablation by micro laser for the first time, with an automatic focusing and robotic scanning mechanism for the brain surface. 5-ALA accumulates on tumors to be metabolized to become PpIX that is a fluorescent. Intra-operative detection of 5-ALA induced PpIX fluorescence provides useful information for tumor detection. The wavelength of the micro laser is 2.8 μm close to the absorption band of water. This laser is effective only on the surface of brain tissue, enabling precise ablation at the boundary between tumor and normal tissue identified by intra-operative 5-ALA induced fluorescence. Combination tests of the fluorescence measurement and the laser ablation were performed, and it was possible to extract the area with fluores-cence appropriately from the measurement data, and the micro laser with automatically scanning selectively ablated the extracted area.

Keywords

Tumor Detection Laser Probe Brain Shift Porcine Brain Laser Ablation System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masafumi Noguchi
    • 1
  • Eisuke Aoki
    • 1
  • Daiki Yoshida
    • 1
  • Etsuko Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Shigeru Omori
    • 2
  • Yoshihiro Muragaki
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Iseki
    • 3
  • Katsushige Nakamura
    • 4
  • Ichiro Sakuma
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Frontier SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.R&D CenterTerumo CorporationKanagawaJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Advanced Techno-surgery, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of MedicineTokyo Women’s Medical UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Mitaka Ko-Ki CorporationTokyoJapan

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