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Introducing Combustion-Turbulence Interaction in Parallel Simulation of Diesel Engines

  • Paola Belardini
  • Claudio Bertoli
  • Stefania Corsaro
  • Pasqua D’Ambra
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4208)

Abstract

In this work we focus on parallel combustion simulation in modern Common Rail Diesel engines when the interaction between complex chemical kinetics and turbulence is taken into account. We introduce a turbulence term in a detailed chemical reaction model and analyze the impact on the reliability of pollutant emission predictions and on the efficiency and scalability of our combustion software. The parallel combustion software we developed adaptively combines numerical schemes based either on Backward Differentiation Formulas or semi-implicit Runge-Kutta methods for the solution of ODE systems arising from the chemical reaction model. It is based on CHEMKIN-II package for managing detailed chemistry and on two general-purpose solvers for adaptive solution of the resulting ODE systems. Furthermore, it is interfaced with KIVA3V-II code in order to simulate the entire engine cycle.

Keywords

Diesel Engine Ignition Delay Combustion Model Turbulent Combustion Model Detailed Chemical Kinetic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paola Belardini
    • 1
  • Claudio Bertoli
    • 1
  • Stefania Corsaro
    • 2
  • Pasqua D’Ambra
    • 3
  1. 1.Istituto Motori (IM)-CNRNaplesItaly
  2. 2.Department of Statistics and Mathematics for Economic ResearchUniversity of Naples “Parthenope”NaplesItaly
  3. 3.Institute for High-Performance Computing and Networking (ICAR)-CNRNaplesItaly

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