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A Neurobiologically Inspired Model of Personality in an Intelligent Agent

  • Stephen Read
  • Lynn Miller
  • Brian Monroe
  • Aaron Brownstein
  • Wayne Zachary
  • Jean-Christophe LeMentec
  • Vassil Iordanov
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4133)

Abstract

We demonstrate how current knowledge about the neurobiology and structure of human personality can be used as the basis for a computational model of personality in intelligent agents (PAC—personality, affect, and culture). The model integrates what is known about the neurobiology of human motivation and personality with knowledge about the psy chometric structure of trait language and personality tests. Thus, the current model provides a principled theoretical account that is based on what is currently known about the structure and neurobiology of human personality and tightly integrates it into a computational architecture. The result is a motive-based computational model of personality that provides a psychologically principled basis for intelligent virtual agents with realistic and engag ing personality.

Keywords

Motivational System Action Structure Intelligent Agent Human Personality Behavioral Inhibition System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Read
    • 1
  • Lynn Miller
    • 2
  • Brian Monroe
    • 1
  • Aaron Brownstein
    • 1
  • Wayne Zachary
    • 3
  • Jean-Christophe LeMentec
    • 3
  • Vassil Iordanov
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Annenberg School for CommunicationUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.CHI Systems, Inc.Ft. WashingtonUSA

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