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The Effect of Depth Perception on Visual-Motor Compensation in Minimal Invasive Surgery

  • Marios Nicolaou
  • Louis Atallah
  • Adam James
  • Julian Leong
  • Ara Darzi
  • Guang-Zhong Yang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4091)

Abstract

Despite technological advances in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in recent years, 3D visualization of the operative field still remains one of greatest challenges. In this paper, the effect of three visualization techniques including conventional 2D, 2D with enhanced depth cue based on shadow, and active 3D displays for novices with no prior adaptation to laparoscopic visualization techniques has been analyzed. A wavelet based paradigm is proposed which offer important insights into the effect of depth perception and visual-motor compensation when performing MIS instrument maneuvers. The proposed method has shown to be advantageous over conventional end-point methods of laparoscopic performance assessment as important supplementary information can be derived from the same trajectories where conventional measures fail to show significant differences.

Keywords

Minimally Invasive Surgery Depth Perception Medical Image Computing Dyadic Wavelet Minimally Invasive Surgery Procedure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marios Nicolaou
    • 1
  • Louis Atallah
    • 1
  • Adam James
    • 1
  • Julian Leong
    • 1
  • Ara Darzi
    • 1
  • Guang-Zhong Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Royal Society/Wolfson Medical Image Computing Laboratory & Department of Surgical Oncology and TechnologyImperial College LondonLondonUK

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