Computer Aids Clients with Psychiatric Disabilities in Cognitive and Vocational Rehabilitation Programs

  • Tzyh-Chyang Chang
  • Jiann-Der Lee
  • Shwu-Jiuan Wu
  • Ming-Jen Yang
  • Chun-Hua Shih
  • Juei-Fen Huang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4061)


The purposes of this study are to assess the aided effects of computer in cognitive and vocational rehabilitation of clients with psychiatric disabilities and to follow up their employment status. All participants from a community mental rehabilitation unit take a three-month computer skill training program. Participants complete computer key-in test and attention test at the beginning and at the end of the computer skill training program. The researcher assesses all participants’ behaviors in class by using observation in every session. After six months, ten participants are still employed and their works are related to computer skills. The significant cognitive improvements of these participants are attention focus ability, problem solving skills, and memory retention ability. In addition, participants completing computer training program can use learned computer skills to obtain more work opportunities. Therefore, applying computer skill training programs to psychiatric disabled clients can improve not only their cognitive abilities but also vocational skills.


Occupational Therapy Vocational Rehabilitation Computer Skill Psychiatric Disability Psychiatric Rehabilitation 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tzyh-Chyang Chang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jiann-Der Lee
    • 1
  • Shwu-Jiuan Wu
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ming-Jen Yang
    • 5
    • 6
  • Chun-Hua Shih
    • 5
    • 6
  • Juei-Fen Huang
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringChang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, TaiwanTaoyuanTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Occupational TherapyChang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, TaiwanTaoyuanTaiwan
  3. 3.Graduate Institute of Medical InformaticsTaipei Medical UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanTaipeiTaiwan
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryKaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, TaiwanKaohsiungTaiwan
  6. 6.Graduate Institute of Behavior SciencesKaohsiung Medical University, TaiwanKaohsiungTaiwan
  7. 7.Department of Foreign LanguageKinmen Institute of Technology, TaiwanJinning Township, Kinmen CountyTaiwan

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