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Usage of IT and Electronic Devices, and Its Structure, for Community-Dwelling Elderly

  • Madoka Ogawa
  • Hiroki Inagaki
  • Yasuyuki Gondo
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4061)

Abstract

Electrical household appliances and IT (information technology) are believed to increase the QOL and well-being of the people who use them. The benefits of electronic devices for elderly people would be more evident than for younger people because it is assumed that such equipment would compensate for the decline of functional ability in the elderly. However, there has been only very limited research on the actual usage and influence of such devices in relation to generation and age. The purposes of the present study were to clarify the actual situation with regard to the use of IT and electronic devices by community-dwelling elderly, and to characterize individuals according to their familiarity with such devices.

Keywords

Electronic Device Digital Divide Digital Device Household Appliance Internet Bank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Madoka Ogawa
    • 1
  • Hiroki Inagaki
    • 2
  • Yasuyuki Gondo
    • 2
  1. 1.Obirin University Graduate SchoolTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyTokyoJapan

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