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Wang-Tiles for the Simulation and Visualization of Plant Competition

  • Monssef Alsweis
  • Oliver Deussen
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4035)

Abstract

The Wang Tiles method is a successful and effective technique for the representation of 2D-texture or 3D-geometry. In this paper we present a new method to fill Wang tiles with a 2D-FON distribution or a 3D-geometry in order to achieve a more efficient runtime. We extend the Wang Tiles method to include information about their position. We further demonstrate how the individual tiles are filled with different intensities by using the FON distribution. Additionally, we present several new methods to eliminate errors between the tile edges and the different resource areas applying FON and corners relaxation techniques.

Keywords

Computer Graphic Annual Conference Natural Scene Interactive Technique Plant Competition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monssef Alsweis
    • 1
  • Oliver Deussen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer and Information ScienceUniversity of KonstanzGermany

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