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Optimization of Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

  • Ann-Katherine Carton
  • Jingjing Li
  • Sara Chen
  • Emily Conant
  • Andrew D. A. Maidment
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4046)

Abstract

Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a tomographic technique in which individual slices through the breast are reconstructed from x-ray projection images acquired over a limited angular range. In contrast-enhanced DBT (CE-DBT) functional information is observed by administration of an radiographic contrast agent. The uptake of iodine in the breast is very small and causes changes in x-ray transmission that are smaller than 5%. This presents significant technical challenges if quantitative assessment of contrast agent concentration in tissue is desired. We modeled CE-DBT acquisition by simulating x-ray spectra from 40 to 49 kV. Comparison of attenuation data of our simulated and measured spectra were found to agree well. We investigated the effect of patient motion and scatter on iodine uptake. These parameters were evaluated by means of experiments and theoretical modeling.

Keywords

Iodine Concentration Iodine Uptake Digital Mammography Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Scatter Fraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann-Katherine Carton
    • 1
  • Jingjing Li
    • 1
  • Sara Chen
    • 1
  • Emily Conant
    • 1
  • Andrew D. A. Maidment
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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