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Tale of Two Context-Based Formalisms for Representing Human Knowledge

  • Patrick Brézillon
  • Avelino J. Gonzalez
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4031)

Abstract

This paper describes an investigation that compared and contrasted Context-based Reasoning (CxBR) and Contextual Graphs (CxG), two paradigms used to represent human intelligence. The specific objectives were to increase understanding of both paradigms, identifying which, if either, excels at a particular function, and to look for potential synergism amongst them. We study these paradigms through ten different aspects, with some indication of which one excels at this particular facet of performance. We point out how they are complementary and finishes with a recommendation for a new synergistic approach, followed by an example of an application of the new approach to tactical

Keywords

Polar Bear Contextual Element Contextual Knowledge Contextual Graph Minor Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Brézillon
    • 1
  • Avelino J. Gonzalez
    • 2
  1. 1.LIP6University Paris 6ParisFrance
  2. 2.ECE DepartmentUniversity of Central FloridaOrlandoUSA

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