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Towards Teaching Metacognition: Supporting Spontaneous Self-Assessment

  • Ido Roll
  • Eunjeong Ryu
  • Jonathan Sewall
  • Brett Leber
  • Bruce M. McLaren
  • Vincent Aleven
  • Kenneth R. Koedinger
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4053)

Abstract

The Self-Assessment Tutor (SAT) is an add-on component to Cognitive Tutors that supports self-assessment in four steps: prediction, attempt, reflection, and projection. The SAT encourages students to self-assess their ability spontaneously while problem solving, and to use help resources accordingly. For that reason its episodes precede the students’ work with the Cognitive Tutor, which itself remains unchanged. The SAT offers detailed feedback and help function to support the Self-Assessment process. A complementary instruction is given to students before working with the SAT. We hypothesize that working with the SAT will encourage students to self-assess on subsequent problems requiring similar skills, and thus will promote learning. A classroom evaluation of SAT is currently in progress.

Keywords

Intelligent Tutor System Cognitive Tutor Interactive Learn Environment Detailed Feedback Similar Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ido Roll
    • 1
  • Eunjeong Ryu
    • 1
  • Jonathan Sewall
    • 1
  • Brett Leber
    • 1
  • Bruce M. McLaren
    • 1
  • Vincent Aleven
    • 1
  • Kenneth R. Koedinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Computer Interaction InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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