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Software Process Improvement with Agile Practices in a Large Telecom Company

  • Jussi Auvinen
  • Rasmus Back
  • Jeanette Heidenberg
  • Piia Hirkman
  • Luka Milovanov
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4034)

Abstract

Besides the promise of rapid and efficient software development, agile methods are well-appreciated for boosting communication and motivation of development teams. However, they are not practical “as such” in large organizations, especially because of the well-established, rigid processes in the organizations. In this paper, we present a case study where a few agile practices were injected into the software process of a large organization in order to pilot pair programming and improve the motivation and competence build-up. The selected agile practices were pair programming, the planning game and collective code ownership. We show how we adjust these practices in order to integrate them into the existing software process of the company in the context of a real software project.

Keywords

User Story Agile Method Pair Programming Agile Practice Agile Software Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jussi Auvinen
    • 1
  • Rasmus Back
    • 1
  • Jeanette Heidenberg
    • 1
  • Piia Hirkman
    • 2
    • 3
  • Luka Milovanov
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Oy L M Ericsson Ab, Telecom R&DTurkuFinland
  2. 2.Turku Centre for Computer Science – TUCSÅbo Akademi UniversityTurkuFinland
  3. 3.Institute for Advanced Management Systems Research 
  4. 4.Department of Computer Science 

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