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Computational Math, Science, and Technology (CMST): A Strategy to Improve STEM Workforce and Pedagogy to Improve Math and Science Education

  • O. Yaşar
  • L. Little
  • R. Tuzun
  • K. Rajasethupathy
  • J. Maliekal
  • M. Tahar
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3992)

Abstract

Integrated approach to education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has recently become a common practice. Technologies such as wireless graphing calculators, electronic whiteboards, and computers help engage students in classroom activities. Modeling and simulation software allow experimentation without usual prerequisites while enabling a pedagogical approach to display interconnectedness of math and science. Controlled simulations and layered approach to learning seem to offer long-sought support for inquiry-based curricula in public schools. Today’s jobs require multiple skills, necessitating a broader college education. While students with multiple majors can be seen on college campuses, the overall number of degree holders in technical fields has gone down steadily. A handful of institutions have established multidisciplinary programs to adjust to these concerns and to better serve diverse interests of students.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Yaşar
    • 1
  • L. Little
    • 1
  • R. Tuzun
    • 1
  • K. Rajasethupathy
    • 1
  • J. Maliekal
    • 1
  • M. Tahar
    • 1
  1. 1.CMST InstituteState University of New YorkCollege at BrockportUSA

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