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The Diet-Aware Dining Table: Observing Dietary Behaviors over a Tabletop Surface

  • Keng-hao Chang
  • Shih-yen Liu
  • Hao-hua Chu
  • Jane Yung-jen Hsu
  • Cheryl Chen
  • Tung-yun Lin
  • Chieh-yu Chen
  • Polly Huang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3968)

Abstract

We are what we eat. Our everyday food choices affect our long-term and short-term health. In the traditional health care, professionals assess and weigh each individual’s dietary intake using intensive labor at high cost. In this paper, we design and implement a diet-aware dining table that can track what and how much we eat. To enable automated food tracking, the dining table is augmented with two layers of weighing and RFID sensor surfaces. We devise a weight-RFID matching algorithm to detect and distinguish how people eat. To validate our diet-aware dining table, we have performed experiments, including live dining scenarios (afternoon tea and Chinese-style dinner), multiple dining participants, and concurrent activities chosen randomly. Our experimental results have shown encouraging recognition accuracy, around 80%. We believe monitoring the dietary behaviors of individuals potentially contribute to diet-aware healthcare.

Keywords

Recognition Accuracy Dietary Behavior Food Transfer Weight Match Food Container 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keng-hao Chang
    • 1
  • Shih-yen Liu
    • 2
  • Hao-hua Chu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jane Yung-jen Hsu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Cheryl Chen
    • 4
  • Tung-yun Lin
    • 3
  • Chieh-yu Chen
    • 1
  • Polly Huang
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Information EngineeringTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Information ManagementTaiwan
  3. 3.Graduate Institute of Networking and MultimediaTaiwan
  4. 4.School and Graduate Institute of NursingTaiwan
  5. 5.Department of Electrical EngineeringNational Taiwan UniversityTaiwan

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