Advertisement

Panel 1 Report: Autonomicity Versus Complexity

  • Ioannis Stavrakakis
  • Antonis Panagakis
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3854)

Abstract

The first panel in WAC2005 focused on the relation between autonomicity and complexity. It is widely believed that autonomicity is a principle that can reduce complexity, but there is also concern that autonomicity itself is complexity-producing. Autonomicity promotes all “self-*” attributes of a system and naturally distributes responsibilities and costs, but it can also bring the system close to a state of “anarchy” (modern Greek interpretation of “autonomous”) if not properly handled. It appears that the overall system complexity may increase, but it is distributed and shared (hence, it is potentially easier to manage), in a similar way in which Integrated Circuits encapsulate the increased complexity and hide it from the bigger system. In addition to reducing complexity in the above sense, autonomicity can also help design truly adaptable, self-tuning and “all-weather” near-optimal systems, something not possible under traditional system design that are difficult to cope with the combined fine-tuning of a very large number of parameters.

Keywords

Autonomic System Autonomic Support Autonomic Communication Evolutionary Game Theory Autonomic Entity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Spirakis, P.: Presentation at the panel ”Autonomicity vs. Complexity”. In: Stavrakakis, I., Smirnov, M. (eds.) WAC 2005. LNCS, vol. 3854, Springer, Heidelberg (2006), Available at: http://www.di.uoa.gr/~istavrak/PDF_presentations_WAC/Panel1_wac_Spirakis.pdf CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Schmidt, S.: Presentation at the panel “Autonomicity vs. Complexity”. In: Stavrakakis, I., Smirnov, M. (eds.) WAC 2005. LNCS, vol. 3854. Springer, Heidelberg (2006), Available at: http://www.di.uoa.gr/~istavrak/PDF_presentations_WAC/Panel1_WAC2005_StefanSchmid.pdf Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pfeifer, T.: Presentation at the panel “Autonomicity vs. Complexity”. In: Stavrakakis, I., Smirnov, M. (eds.) WAC 2005. LNCS, vol. 3854. Springer, Heidelberg (2006), Available at: http://www.di.uoa.gr/~istavrak/PDF_presentations_WAC/Panel1_Pfeifer_WAC2005.pdf Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Smirnov, M., Popescu-Zeletin, R.: Presentation at the panel “Autonomicity vs. Complexity”. In: Stavrakakis, I., Smirnov, M. (eds.) WAC 2005. LNCS, vol. 3854. Springer, Heidelberg (2006), Available at: http://www.di.uoa.gr/~istavrak/PDF_presentations_WAC/Panel1_WAC2005_Smirnov.pdf CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lewis, D.: Presentation at the panel “Autonomicity vs. Complexity”. In: Stavrakakis, I., Smirnov, M. (eds.) WAC 2005. LNCS, vol. 3854. Springer, Heidelberg (2006), Available at: http://www.di.uoa.gr/~istavrak/PDF_presentations_WAC/Panel1_wac05-lewis.pdf CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    McCann, J.A., Huebscher, M.C.: Evaluation Issues in Autonomic Computing. In: Jin, H., Pan, Y., Xiao, N., Sun, J. (eds.) GCC 2004. LNCS, vol. 3252, pp. 597–608. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Santivanez, C.: Presentation at the panel “Autonomicity vs. Complexity”. In: Stavrakakis, I., Smirnov, M. (eds.) WAC 2005. LNCS, vol. 3854. Springer, Heidelberg (2006), Available at: http://www.di.uoa.gr/~istavrak/PDF_presentations_WAC/Panel1_WAC2005_Santivanez.pdf CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ioannis Stavrakakis
    • 1
  • Antonis Panagakis
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Informatics & TelecommunicationsNational & Kapodistrian University of AthensAthensGreece

Personalised recommendations